We begin our journey of foods made from hemp seed with new hemisphere™ Hemp Seed Oil …

 

A bit about our oil

Our oil is 100% pure, chemical residue-free, and produced in a GE/GMO free production process. It is made from oil extracted locally from the cold pressed high quality seed of the Cannabis Sativa hemp plant. If you have been reading the blogs in this series, you will know that just because our oil comes from the Cannabis plant there is no need for alarm! This is because our oil is THC free (tetrahydrocannabinol). THC is what produces the drug ‘high’ associated with marijuana the recreational drug.

 

The oil is a rich-green colour and this is due to high levels of chlorophyll in the hemp seed. Chlorophyll occurs naturally in plants and is needed to provide them with energy. Slight oil colour variations may occur between batches and reflects a natural product.

 

It packs a nutritional punch

new hemisphere™ Hemp Seed Oil provides us with both omega 3 and omega 6 essential fatty acids needed for general health and wellbeing. Essential fatty acids must be provided for in the diet because these fatty acids cannot be made by the body. These fatty acids are supplied in a ratio of 3:1. A diet with a higher ratio of Omega 6 to Omega 3 has been shown to be detrimental to health (Simopoulos 2008).

 

Hemp seed oil also contains gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), a fatty acid known to have anti-inflammatory properties. Scientific research has shown long-term uncontrolled inflammation to be involved in chronic diseases such as heart disease, diabetes, cancer, and Parkinson’s disease (Kapoor and Huang 2006). Furthermore, this oil contains a high percentage (>75%) of polyunsaturated fatty acids which when replacing saturated fat in the diet, are indicated to prevent coronary heart disease (MOH 2015, Eating Statement 2).

 

And in capsule form too

For convenience we provide a capsule form. Taken daily as a dietary supplement,  the acclaimed health benefits of these include: supporting joint health, nourishing hair and/or nails, helping maintain normal cholesterol levels and blood pressure in healthy individuals, balancing hormone levels, long lasting energy levels, supporting brain function and development, helping skin conditions and wounds heal, and supporting cardiovascular circulation and organ health.

 

Care for your oil

In order to reap the most benefits from your hemp seed oil nutritionally, you need to care for your oil. This includes storing in a cool dark place for up to 12 months if it is unopened. If opened, store in the refrigerator and consume within 3 months. Hemp seed oil is particularly susceptible to degradation by heat (because of its high polyunsaturated fat content) so it is important you only consume your hemp seed oil in its raw state. You should not cook with the oil (Callaway & Pate 2009).

 

So how do I use hemp seed oil?

Use the oil as a dressing for salads. It is perfectly delicious with lemon juice and salt and pepper or you can get fancy and follow a recipe. You can mix it into your breakfast cereal. It is particularly good with porridge at this time of year. Other ideas include drizzling over roast vegetables, soups, and as a dipping oil with a spice or herb mix with a selection of breads. Consumption by the tablespoon straight from the bottle is fine too!

 

And if you’re still not sure what to do with this exceptionally nutritious oil, try the following recipe:

https://www.newhemisphere.co.nz/recipes/avocado-hemp-seed-smash/

 

Bon appétit!

 

 

 

REFERENCES:

Callaway, JC & Pate, DW 2009, ‘Hempseed Oil’ in RA Moreau & A Kamal-Eldin (eds), Gourmet and Health-Promoting Specialty Oils, American Oil Chemists Press, Urbana, Il, pp. 185-213.

Kapoor, R & Huang, YS 2006, ‘Gamma Linolenic Acid: An Antiinflammatory Omega-6 Fatty Acid’, Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology, vol. 7, no. 6, pp.531-534.

Ministry of Health (MOH) 2015, Eating and Activity Guidelines for New Zealand Adults, brochure, MOH, Wellington, NZ.

Simopoulos, AP 2008, ‘The Importance of the Omega-6/Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ratio in Cardiovascular Disease and Other Chronic Diseases’, Experimental Biology and Medicine, vol. 233, pp. 674-688.